Letter from Bliss Carman to Mitchell Kennerley, February 14, 1916: a machine-readable transcription.


Author: Carman, Bliss, 1861-1929

Creation of machine-readable version:
Alan Burk, University of New Brunswick Libraries
Creation of digital images:
Jennifer Jeffries, University of New Brunswick Libraries, Electronic Text Centre and Patti Auld, University of New Brunswick Libraries, Archives and Special Collections.
Conversion to TEI.2-conformant markup:
Alan Burk, University of New Brunswick Libraries
kilobytes
University of New Brunswick Libraries
Fredericton, New Brunswick ca160214

Publicly-accessible

URL: http://www.lib.unb.ca/Texts/Special_Collections/Hathaway.html


1997, August

Images have been included of the manuscript version.

About the original source:

Letter from Bliss Carman to Mitchell Kennerley, February 14, 1916.


Author: Bliss Carman

3p
Unpublished

1916, February 14

The Rufus Hathaway collection of Canadian literature. Vertical file. Folder 462.

Prepared for the University of New Brunswick Libraries Electronic Text Centre

All quotation marks retained as data.

Verification has been made against the printed manuscript copy.



1916-02-14
English non-fiction; prose LCSH 24-bit colour; 300-400 dpi.
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Letter from Bliss Carman to Mitchell Kennerley, February 14, 1916

Page Image


New Canaan, Connecticut

14. February 1916 Dear Mr.
Hathaway:

Mr.
Kennerley has sent
me your letter of enquiry
about some "items" of mine.
If I can find a copy of the
program (
Dec. 1915) you
are welcome to it.

The pamphlet issued by
“ The Freaks ” puzzles me.
I don't recall it at all.
But I think “ The Freaks ”


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used to meet for lunch at

Salani's a very good restaurant in
New York years ago.
You might write to Mr.
Harry
Thompson Editor The Country
Gentleman
(Curtis Publishing Co.
Philadelphia)The
Riley poem
was published first in the News
an evening Paper of Indianapolis
7 October
1914, a year ago
when I was there. So the
pamphlet (whatever it is)

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is but a first issue of the
lines.

But these things are of small
account in these days.

Wilson here goes from bad
to worse. There seems to
be nothing he won't coun-
tenance for a political
reason. So the platitudinous
preacher of high sentiments
is revealed as a shuffling
paltroon. "A pox on him!"
as they would have said in
the good old days.

Yours Ever with
Best Wishes
Bliss Carman